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Opening Keynote

Thursday, May 28, 2015

Why Do People Volunteer? - Opening Keynote

Need help with your next meeting? Here is a roster of reasons why people volunteer:

1. Fill time
2. Repay a perceived indebtedness
3. Because someone they love benefits
4. To set an example for children
5. To work as a family
6. Someone they love is also involved
7. To meet people
8. To please someone else
9. To have fun
10. To gain skills
11. To gain experience
12. To be visible
13. To gain credit
14. To express their religion or belief
15. To find happiness
16. To employ otherwise unused gifts or skills
17. Because of tradition
18. As part of a group
19. To maintain health
20. To explore new learning, ideas
21. To heal
22. To avert loneliness
23. Because of interest
24. As a hobby
25. Out of concern
26. To receive a tax benefit
27. To counter-point paid work
28. As an extension of a job
29. Because they were assigned
30. To survive tragedy (cope)
31. To test leadership skills
32. To gain recognition
33. To acquire self-confidence
34. To be a change agent
35. To right a wrong
36. To work in a safe place
37. To save money
38. To have a purpose
39. To be a good neighbor
40. To get out of the house
41. To keep active
42. To experience new lifestyles
43. To feel a sense of power and success

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Tuesday, May 19, 2015

Spend Less, Save Time - Opening Keynote

Patricia Fripp, CSP, CPAE offers eight tips for corporate meeting planners to save time and money:

Tip #1. After every meeting and event, do an "after action analysis." Write down what went right, what went wrong, what you would do differently if you were planning the meeting today, and who the vendors were who made your life easier.

Tip #2. In hiring vendors, do not always go for the lowest price. Whoever you hire, it affects your image. Reliability and follow-through are more important than a lower bid. Everyone is downsizing and looking for new ways to cut costs, but a vendor at a lower price may not be the answer.

Tip #3. Learn to make other people heroes. Whether dealing with vendors or people in other departments of your own company, if the person works hard and well, write a note of thanks to them and send a copy to their boss.

Tip #4. Make sure your speaker knows the terms used in your association, i.e. these people use "clients" not "customers." Also, alert the speaker to particulars of his/her audience...for example, mention the women in the audience are members, not spouses. One professional speaker was not warned and spoke "down" to his audience, making them feel bad, and the meeting planner look bad.

Tip #5. If you do mailings before a meeting or convention, be sure to put the speaker on the mailing list. This way the speaker knows what else is going on at the meeting, what the various topics are, if the schedule has been revised, and if his/her speaking time has been changed and no one remembered to tell the speaker.

Tip #6. If you are expecting a speaker to arrive the night before an event, leave them a note asking them to let the meeting planner know they have actually arrived. If you know the speaker has in fact arrived, you will undoubtedly sleep better. Leave an emergency number where you can always be reached.

Tip #7. Don't save the best for last. Often corporations take their top performers to a fancy resort for a meeting of several days. They have one important outside speaker and they want to send the employees back to work with a bang. You will get more value for your money if you schedule the speaker the first day instead of the last. At the end of the conference the employees may be tired, hungover, or worried about packing and making the plane.

Tip #8. Use E-mail. Get on-line with networks of meeting planners who can share their experiences. Find a group similar to yours and find out the names of the most successful speakers they have used and which vendors made their lives difficult or easy.

Call 800-634-3035 or email pfripp@ix.netcom.com to learn about her speaking, or coaching.

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Wednesday, May 13, 2015

Topic of the Century: Work-life Balance - Opening Keynote

Work-life balance -- the term is referred to so often, you'd think that most people know what it means. In Mark Sanborn's insightful leadership blog, my recent guest article defines work-life balance and identifies the six supporting disciplines:

                            * Self Management
                            * Time Management
                            * Stress Management
                            * Change Management
                            * Technology Management
                            * Leisure Management



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Monday, May 04, 2015

Pick a Big Meeting Room! - Opening Keynote

As recently as a few years ago, 30% of white-collar workers still had private offices, based on a poll of 9,300 people by office furniture maker Steelcase. However the typical office has shrunk. It was about 16 by 20 feet many years ago, declining to 8 by 10 feet.... So, 320 square feet versus 80 square feet.

For meetings then, choose larger rooms. People in tiny cramped offices will appreciate it!


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Friday, April 24, 2015

An Eternal Speech Theme - Opening Keynote

In the Divine Comedy, Dante "sees that all crimes involve loving the wrong things: money, power, oneself or another's spouse."

What a powerful speech theme!

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Monday, April 20, 2015

2nd Copy of Handout Materials - Opening Keynote

Here is a neat idea when distributing handout material for attendees: offer a second copy to everyone and, in a short note, invite them to share the information with someone who could benefit from it!

Two other timely blogs for your perusal:
* for the time-pressured: www.BreathingSpaceBlog.com
* for the info-whelmed: www.InterruptionManagement.com

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Friday, April 17, 2015

Presentation Rehearsal? - Opening Keynote

Many people ask if rehearsing in front of the mirror is a good idea. Doug Stevenson, noted speaker coach, says that it is not. "Rather than looking outside of you to see what something looks like, look inside to discover what it feels like. Movement flows from intention. Every movement, gesture and inflection should be organic first, then choreographed."

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